He went on injured reserve in December due to a neck injury.

Johnson will be healthy for 2018, and the team will likely restock its running back rotation behind him. Peterson was a helpful ally last fall, but if he wants to return to Arizona, it’ll have to be as a backup.

Peterson’s days as a starting running back are probably over. It’s also possible he may have played his final down in the NFL, although Peterson told ESPN’s Josina Anderson that his neck is fully healed and he does want to play next season.

The record-setting tailback averaged just 3.5 yards per carry in 2017 and turns 33 years old in March — that’s ancient for an NFL running back. His last two seasons have ended early due to injury, and while he had a pair of 100-plus yard performances last year, he also had six games in which he gained fewer than 30 yards.

He’s also not much of a receiver, a skill NFL teams covet in their running backs now.

Sanders turns 31 in March and is coming off an ineffective season hurt by a midseason ankle injury. Denver keeping Thomas means not keeping Sanders.

Martin’s hot-and-cold relationship with Dirk Koetter will end with the RB’s release at age 29. The Bucs were disappointed with his play post-suspension, and they’ll move on with Peyton Barber and/or others in the backfield.

It seems clear Cobb won’t be returning to Green Bay as the team tries to keep Nelson after signing Davante Adams to a massive extension. Cobb, 27, was a fading blip in the offense with or without Rodgers.

Turning only 29 in August, Taylor has a few good years left as a versatile veteran stopgap. It just won’t be for Buffalo, which will move on to find a true franchise guy it totally trusts. Arizona and Denver are Taylor’s best fits elsewhere.packers_114